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The DC Code: § 31-2703 Making of rates.

Index31 Insurance and Securities. (Refs & Annos)
a
Rates for insurance within the scope of this chapter shall not be excessive, inadequate, or unfairly discriminatory.
b
Due consideration shall be given to past and prospective loss experience within and outside the District, to physical hazards, to safety and loss prevention factors, to underwriting practice and judgment, to catastrophe hazards, if any, to a reasonable margin for underwriting profit and contingencies; to dividends, savings, or unabsorbed premium deposits allowed or returned by companies to their policyholders, members, or subscribers; to past and prospective expenses both country-wide and those specially applicable to the District; to whether classification rates exist generally for the risks under consideration; to the rarity or peculiar characteristics of the risks; and to all other relevant factors within and outside the District. Due consideration shall be given to the net investment income (including the realized capital gains) on all cash and invested assets held against all unearned premium reserves and loss reserves of any nature. Unrealized capital gains or losses shall not be considered in the rate-making process.
c
Nothing in this section shall be taken to prohibit as unfairly discriminatory the establishment of classifications or modifications of classifications of risks based upon the size, expense, management, individual experience, location or dispersion of hazard, or any other reasonable considerations attributable to such risks provided such classifications and modifications apply to all risks under the same or substantially similar circumstances or conditions.
d
Nothing in this chapter shall be construed to require uniformity in insurance rates, classifications, rating plans, or practices.
e
Nothing in this chapter shall abridge or restrict the freedom of contract of companies, agents, brokers, or employees with reference to the commissions or salaries to be paid to such agents, brokers, or employees by companies.
f
(1) Every classification plan fixed, established, and promulgated by the Commissioner shall be so structured as to produce rates or premium charges which are adequate, not excessive, and not unfairly discriminatory.
2
Every final rate or premium charge proposed to be used by any motor vehicle insurer shall be filed with the Commissioner and shall be adequate, not excessive, and not unfairly discriminatory. A motor vehicle insurance rate may be held by the Commissioner to be excessive if the rate is unreasonably high for the insurance provided and is not actuarially justified based on the commonly accepted actuarial principles. In determining whether rates comply with standards under this subsection, due consideration shall be given for past and prospective loss experience within and outside the District, a reasonable margin for underwriting profit and contingencies, dividends, savings, or unabsorbed premium deposits allowed or returned by insurers to their policyholders or members or subscribers, past and prospective expenses, both countrywide and in the District, and investment income earned or realized by insurers both from their unearned premiums and from their loss reserve funds. If the Commissioner finds after a hearing that a rate is not in compliance with this subsection, he shall order that its use be discontinued for any policy issued or renewed after a date specified in the order and the order may prospectively provide for premium adjustment of any policy then in force.
f-1
(1)(A) Every final rate or premium charge proposed to be used by a medical malpractice insurer shall be filed with the Commissioner and shall be adequate, not excessive, and not unfairly discriminatory. A medical malpractice rate shall be excessive if the rate is unreasonably high for the insurance provided. In determining whether rates are adequate, not excessive, and not unfairly discriminatory, due consideration shall be given to:
i
Past and prospective loss experience within the District;
ii
A reasonable margin for underwriting profit and contingencies;
iii
Dividends, savings, or unabsorbed premium deposits allowed or returned by insurers to their policyholders, members, or subscribers;
iv
Past and prospective expenses in the District;
v
All investment income reasonably attributable to medical malpractice insurance in the District.
B
If District experience is not credible, the Commissioner may consider experience outside the District. The Commissioner shall promulgate rules setting forth the extent to which and the circumstances under which an insurer may rely on experience outside the District.
2
If a medical malpractice insurer wishes to change a rate, it shall file a complete rate application with the Commissioner. A complete rate application shall include all information, including all actuarial data, projections, and assumptions, that the medical malpractice insurer has relied on in calculating its proposed rates. All such information shall be made available when filed in accordance with subchapter II of Chapter 5 of Title 2.
3
The Commissioner shall notify the public of any application by a medical malpractice insurer for a rate change increase. The application shall be deemed approved 60 days after public notice unless the proposed rate change increase exceeds 10%. If the proposed rate change increase exceeds 10%, the Commissioner shall hold a hearing on the proposed change and shall issue an order approving, denying, or modifying the proposed change within 90 days after public notice of the proposed change. Any person shall have a right to testify in a hearing held by the Commissioner. The Commissioner shall promulgate rules governing the public hearing.
4
If the Commissioner finds, after a hearing, that a rate used by a medical malpractice insurer does not comply with this subsection, the Commissioner shall order the insurer to discontinue using the rate and to issue a refund to any policyholder who has paid the rate to the extent that the Commissioner has found it excessive.
g
No company, agent, or broker shall make, issue, or deliver, or knowingly permit the making, issuance, or delivery of any policy of insurance within the scope of this chapter contrary to pertinent filings which are in effect for the company as provided in this chapter, except that upon the written application of the insured stating his reasons therefor, filed with and approved by the Commissioner, a rate in excess of that provided by a filing otherwise applicable may be used on any specific risk.
h
Every insurer writing motor vehicle insurance in the District shall file with the Commissioner, in such form as he shall order, complete financial records showing the amount of profit on every line of motor vehicle insurance during the previous year.
i
The Office of the People's Counsel shall serve as advocate for consumers in rate hearings before the Commissioner and the costs associated with such advocacy shall be borne by the insurer or insurers requesting the rate hearing.

Historical and Statutory

Prior Codifications 1981 Ed., § 35-1703. 1973 Ed., § 35-1503. Effect of Amendments D.C. Law 16-263 added subsec. (f-1). Legislative History of Laws Law 4-155, the "Compulsory/No-Fault Motor Vehicle Insurance Act of 1982," was introduced in Council and assigned Bill No. 4-140, which was referred to the Committee on Public Services and Consumer Affairs. The Bill was adopted on first, amended first, second amended first, and second readings on May 11, 1982, May 25, 1982 June 8, 1982, and June 22, 1982, respectively. Deemed approved without Mayoral signature upon expiration of the Mayoral Review period on July 22, 1982, it was assigned Act No. 4-226 and transmitted to both Houses of Congress for its review. Law 6-96, the "Compulsory/No-Fault Motor Vehicle Insurance Act of 1982 Amendments Act of 1985," was introduced in Council and assigned Bill No. 6-249, which was referred to the Committee on Consumer and Regulatory Affairs. The Bill was adopted on first and second readings on November 5, 1985, and November 19, 1985, respectively. Signed by the Mayor on November 22, 1985, it was assigned Act No. 6-104 and transmitted to both Houses of Congress for its review. Law 11-160, the "Automobile Insurance Amendment Act of 1996," was introduced in Council and assigned Bill No. 11-157, which was referred to the Committee on Consumer and Regulatory Affairs. The Bill was adopted on first and second readings on May 7, 1996, and June 4, 1996, respectively. Signed by the Mayor on June 26, 1996, it was assigned Act No. 11-296 and transmitted to both Houses of Congress for its review. D.C. Law 11-160 became effective on September 20, 1996. For legislative history of D.C. Law 11-268, see Historical and Statutory Notes following § 31-2701. For Law 16-263, see notes following § 31-2701. Miscellaneous Notes Report by Commissioner of Insurance and Securities: Section 5 of D.C. Law 11- 160 provided that "Within two years of September 20, 1996, the Commissioner of Insurance and Securities shall prepare and submit to the Council of the District of Columbia for its review a report on the impact of this act on the private passenger motor vehicle insurance market or any part thereof, the funding for the Office of Insurance, the District of Columbia insurance premium tax, the number of insurers doing business in the District, and the number of insurers domiciled in the District of Columbia. In preparing such report, the Commissioner may request from specific private passenger motor vehicle insurers doing business in the District, or from all such insurers, reasonable and pertinent information. Information which is proprietary to any affected insurer shall be treated as confidential by the Commissioner, but may be used in the aggregate with other information from other affected insurers for statistical or other reporting purposes." Department of Insurance abolished: See Historical and Statutory Notes following § 35-2701. DC CODE § 31-2703 Current through December 11, 2012

Credits

(May 20, 1948, 62 Stat. 243, ch. 324, § 3; Sept. 18, 1982, D.C. Law 4-155, § 14(a), 29 DCR 3491; Mar. 4, 1986, D.C. Law 6-96, § 3, 32 DCR 7245; May 21, 1997, D.C. Law 11-268, § 10(t), 44 DCR 1730; Sept. 20, 1996, D.C. Law 11-160, § 4, 43 DCR 3722; Mar. 14, 2007, D.C. Law 16-263, § 101(b), 54 DCR 807.)