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The DC Code: § 44-601 Findings.

Index44 Charitable and Curative Institutions. (Refs & Annos)

The Council finds and declares the following:

1
Charitable healthcare entities hold all their assets in trust, and those assets are irrevocably dedicated, as a condition of their tax-exempt status, to the specific charitable purposes set forth in the articles of incorporation of the entities.
2
The public is the beneficiary of that trust.
3
Healthcare entities have a substantial and beneficial effect on the quality of life of the people of the District of Columbia, providing as part of their charitable mission a large list of services to low-income families and the poor, elderly, and people with disabilities.
4
Transfers of the assets of healthcare entities, such as by sale, joint venture, or other sharing of assets, to for-profit entities directly affect the charitable uses of those assets and may adversely affect the public as the beneficiary of the charitable assets.
5
The Attorney General for the District of Columbia is entrusted by common law to bring actions on behalf of the public in the event of a breach of the charitable trust of a healthcare entity and to represent the public in the sale or other transfer of the assets of a healthcare entity.
6
It is in the best interest of the public to ensure that the public interest is fully protected whenever the assets or operations of a healthcare entity are transferred, directly or indirectly, from a charitable trust to a for-profit or mutual benefit entity.
7
The approval by the Attorney General for the District of Columbia of any transfer of assets or operations is necessary to ensure the protection of these trusts.

Historical and Statutory

Prior Codifications 1981 Ed., § 32-551. Effect of Amendments D.C. Law 15-354 substituted "Attorney General for the District of Columbia" for "Corporation Counsel". D.C. Law 16-305, in par. (3), substituted "people with disabilities" for "disabled". Legislative History of Laws Law 12-32, the "Healthcare Entity Conversion Act of 1997," was introduced in Council and assigned Bill No. 12-112, which was referred to the Committee on. The Bill was adopted on first and second readings on June 3, 1997, and July 1, 1997, respectively. Signed by the Mayor on July 17, 1997, it was assigned Act No. 12-128 and transmitted to both Houses of Congress for its review. D.C. Law 12-32 became effective on October 23, 1997. Law 12-264, the "Technical Amendments Act of 1998," was introduced in Council and assigned Bill No. 12-804, which was referred to the Committee of the Whole. The Bill was adopted on first and second readings on November 10, 1998, and December 1, 1998, respectively. Signed by the Mayor on January 7, 1999, it was assigned Act No. 12-626 and transmitted to both Houses of Congress for its review. D.C. Law 12-264 became effective on April 20, 1999. For Law 15-354, see notes following § 44-212. For Law 16-305, see notes following § 44-102.01. DC CODE § 44-601 Current through December 11, 2012

Credits

(Oct. 23, 1997, D.C. Law 12-32, § 2, 44 DCR 4819; Apr. 20, 1999, D.C. Law 12-264, § 34, 46 DCR 2118; Apr. 13, 2005, D.C. Law 15-354, § 66, 52 DCR 2638; Apr. 24, 2007, D.C. Law 16-305, § 71, 53 DCR 6198.)