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The DC Code: § 7-2331 Findings.

Index7 Human Health Care and Safety. (Refs & Annos)
a
The terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001 in New York, Virginia, and Pennsylvania, resulting in grievous loss of life and the concomitant disruption of our national regional services, highlight the need for, and value of, intergovernmental planning and programming at the state level, including the District of Columbia.
b
Mutual assistance between the states entering into this compact and the District of Columbia is also needed for the management of any emergency or disaster that is duly declared by the governor of a state, or the Mayor of the District of Columbia, whether arising from natural disaster, technological hazard, man-made disaster, civil emergency aspects of resources shortages, community disorders, insurgency, or enemy attack.
c
There is also a need for mutual assistance between the states and the District of Columbia fostering cooperation in emergency-related exercises, testing, or other training activities using equipment and personnel simulating performance of any aspect of the giving and receiving of aid by party states or subdivisions thereof during emergencies, such actions occurring outside actual declared emergency periods.
d
The United States Congress issued the Emergency Management Assistance Compact (EMAC) Joint Resolution (Pub. L. No. 104-321) on October 19, 1996, authorizing states, including the District of Columbia, to join in the EMAC.

Historical and Statutory

Legislative History of Laws Law 14-194, the "Omnibus Anti-Terrorism Act of 2002", was introduced in Council and assigned Bill No. 14-373, which was referred to the Committee on the Judiciary. The Bill was adopted on first and second readings on April 9, 2002, and May 7, 2002, respectively. Signed by the Mayor on June 3, 2002, it was assigned Act No. 14-380 and transmitted to both Houses of Congress for its review. D.C. Law 14-194 became effective on October 17, 2002. Complementary Legislation: Ala.--Code 1975, §§ 31-9-1 to 31-9-24. Alaska--AS 26.23.135, 26.23.136. Ariz.--A.R.S. §§ 26-401, 26-402. Ark.--A.C.A. §§ 12-49-401, 12-49-402. Cal.--West's Ann.Cal.Gov.Code, §§ 179 to 179.9. Colo.--West's C.R.S.A. §§ 24-60-2901, 24-60-2902. Conn.--C.G.S.A. § 28-23a. Del.--20 Del.C. §§ 3401 to 3403. D.C.--D.C. Official Code, 2001 Ed. §§ 7-2331, 7-2332. Fla.--West's F.S.A. §§ 252.921 to 252.933. Ga.--O.C.G.A. §§ 38-3-80, 38-3-81. Ill.--S.H.A. 45 ILCS 151/1 to 151/99. Ind.--West's A.I.C. 10-14-5-1 to 10-14-5-16. Iowa--I.C.A. § 29C.21. Kan.--K.S.A. 48-9a01. Ky.--KRS 39A.950. La.--LSA-R.S. 29:751. Maine--37-B M.R.S.A. §§ 921 to 933. Md.--Code, Public Safety, §§ 14-701, 14-702. Mich.--M.C.L.A. §§ 3.991 to 3.994, 3.1001 to 3.1004. Miss.--Code 1972, §§ 45-18-1, 45-18-3. Mo.--V.A.M.S. § 44.415. Neb.--R.R.S. 1943, § A1-124. Nev.--N.R.S. 415.010. N.H.--RSA 108:1 to 108:3. N.J.--N.J.S.A. 38A:20-4, 38A:20-5. N.M.--NMSA 1978, §§ 12-10-14, 12-10-15. N.Y.--McKinney's Executive Law, § 29-g. N.C.--G.S. §§ 166A-40 to 166A-53. Okl.--63 Okl.St.Ann. §§ 684.1 to 684.13. Ore.--ORS 401.041 to 401.043. Pa.--35 Pa.C.S.A. §§ 7601 to 7604. R.I.--Gen. Laws. 1956, §§ 30-15.9-1 to 30-15.9-14. S.C.--Code 1976, §§ 25-9-410, 25-9-420. S.D.--SDCL 34-48A-53. Tenn.--T.C.A. § 58-2-403. Vt.--20 V.S.A. §§ 101 to 112. Va.--Code 1950, § 44-146.28:1. Wash.--West's RCWA 38.10.010 to 38.10.900. Wis.--W.S.A. 323.80. W.Va.--Code, 15-5-22. DC CODE § 7-2331 Current through December 11, 2012

Credits

(Oct. 17, 2002, D.C. Law 14-194, § 602, 49 DCR 5306.)